Legal NewsThe Herrera Law Firm Inc ask drivers to watch out for motorcycles

April 20th, 2012

The San Antonio personal injury lawyer at The Herrera Law Firm, Inc. urge drivers to keep an eye on motorcyclists, who are vulnerable to serious injuries in wrecks.

The Texas Department of Transportation reports that 87 percent of motorcycle accidents result in injuries or death to the rider. People on motorcycles are five times more likely to sustain injuries and 25 times more likely to die in a wreck than people in cars, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Continue reading »

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Bikers are 300 percent more likely to sustain a motorcycle injury – California Personal Accident Attorneys

April 19th, 2012

Drivers and passengers in cars have safety features in place such as airbags and seatbelts to protect them. Bikers typically have nothing but their clothing and a helmet between them and the pavement. Bikers are 300 percent more likely to sustain a motorcycle injury than someone inside of a car in a crash, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Motorcycle injuries can be catastrophic, ranging from back injuries to paralysis or traumatic brain injuries.

Unfortunately, insurance companies often try to shift blame to the motorcycle rider, even when a driver is clearly at fault. In many cases, we hear about drivers who fail to “see” the motorcyclist. Motorcycles have a right to share the road with other vehicles. See Motorcycle Accident Lawyer Napa Failing to see the biker is simply negligence. The driver needs to be held responsible. At the Law Offices of Freeman & Freeman, we’re dedicated to our clients and pursuing the maximum compensation allowed under state law.

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Pennsylvania Harrisburg Fatal auto accidents involving teens raise questions about state laws

April 17th, 2012

The National Safety Council, a leader in promoting Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) to reduce the number of crashes among teens, feels that it is important to regulate risky driving behavior and encourage the development of safe driving skills. In an aim to reduce the number of teen auto accidents, the NSC urges all states to adopt seven rules for teenage drivers:

– minimum age 16 for a learner’s permit

– six months before unsupervised driving

– minimum 30 hours supervised driving during learner’s stage

– intermediate licensing at 16? minimum

– intermediate night driving restriction beginning no later than 10 p.m.

– no more than one non-family passenger for intermediate drivers

– minimum age 17 for a full license.

If all states adopted these suggested rules, an estimated 2,000 lives could be saved each year nationwide. According to the National Safety Council, states with stronger, comprehensive Graduated Driver Licensing systems see a higher reduction in teen crashes.

In an effort to enhance safety on Pennsylvania roads, Governor Corbett and the Legislature recently agreed on changes to the Vehicle Code involving Graduated Driver Licensing requirements, passenger restrictions for junior drivers and passenger restraint laws. The new rules took effect on Dec. 27, 2011. The changes to the law were initiated to help junior drivers receive more comprehensive training, ease young driver distractions through limiting the number of passengers they may carry and to improve general highway safety.

If you or a loved one has been injured in an car accident, contact Metzger Wickersham. One of our Harrisburg auto accident attorneys can answer your questions and take every step to ensure that your rights are protected

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News Defective Children’s Products and Dangerous Toys Can Cause Child Injuries

April 17th, 2012

When our child has a birthday, family members and friends always have the best intentions when they bring a gift for occasion. Unfortunately, though, parents can’t be too careful about safety and must examine anything given to the birthday boy or girl, before the child is allowed to play with it, right down to the packaging.

Dangerous children’s products have the potential to cause serious child injury, even wrongful death, whether it’s something they’ll play with at home or if it’s for a favorite sport or other outdoor activity. It’s hard to imagine that a present as seemingly harmless as a doll, a board game, building blocks, miniature cars, or even art supplies could be dangerous toys but, depending on where an item was made, the materials involved and how it was packaged, even the most basic of kids’ playthings can pose a risk to youngsters. See personal injury lawyer corpus Christi

In some cases, there may be toy choking hazards, such as when small parts can be pulled off of a doll, toy car, toy truck, dress up costumes, toy musical instruments or toy construction sets. Other toy choking dangers include small board game pieces, puzzle pieces, girls’ jewelry, crayons, pen caps and marbles. With kids, there is almost no limit to the ways they could be injured by a defective children’s product, and San Antonio, Texas personal injury lawyers, Herrera Law Firm, see every type of child toy injury.

Even children’s products designed to keep kids safe may actually injure them, including bicycle helmets, booster seats, car seats, playpens, safety gates and pool floatation devices. Likewise, practical basics such as cribs, strollers and high chairs can pose dangers such as defective straps, buckles, latches, wheels or trays.

Standard playground equipment, especially things like climbing gyms and trampolines, can result in fractures, broken bones, slip and fall accidents or, in the case of a severe defective toy injury, traumatic brain injury.

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